Women’s Voices at The Old Market

Three performances will be taking place at The Old Market this month as part of their Women’s Voices Mini-Series. Starting on the 15th, Three Generations of Women will kick off the mini-series. Created by the Broken Leg Theatre company, Three Generations of Women is ‘as story of the horrors of moving back in with your mum in your 30s, of finally appreciating the best piece of advice your grandmother ever gave you and of extraordinary family secrets held across the generations.’ Elsie was born in 1936 in a Yorkshire pit village, Gilly is the first woman in her family to go to University and Frankie learns everything she can about sex from Judy Blume. Hear these extraordinary stories from women growing up in very different generations. Brighton based singer-songwriter Ellie Ford will be performing a set after the show.

Moon Tales – image belongs to Moon Tales

On the 22nd, enjoy a double bill of incredible shows; Moon Tales and Mmm Hmmm at Other Spaces. Winner of the Argus Angel Award for Artistic Excellence at the Brighton Fringe in 2015, Moon Tales tells the stories of ‘female characters from across time and place, telling universal stories of lifelong secrets, sex, regret, desire, hope, told with bittersweet humour. From the ‘burbs of Johannesburg to Medieval Yorkshire, these are eloquent, darkly funny portraits which capture the diversity- and commonality – of the female experience.’ Mmm Hmmm on the other hand, is a musical journey in which three female voices snapshot everyday life. From an apology to a First Great Western buffet cart, Verity Standen’s original songs show us what it’s truly like to be human.

Echoes – image: Rosalind Furlong

There is no better way to end the Women’s Voices Mini-Series than by Echoes, which tells the stories of two women born 175 years apart. After a critically acclaimed season at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, Henry Naylor, the Fringe First Award winning Playwright brings his show to Brighton. Presented as monologues, listen to the surprising similarities between the Islamist adventures of today and early Victorian pioneers. One is a student jihadi from London and the other a Victorian member of the Fishing Fleet. The Fishing Fleet were the women who travelled to India to be brides of those men who were setting up the British Empire. Both women travel to the East with a mission to impose a system of government upon unwilling people. Echoes is a ‘provocative and brutal tale of colonialism, and the rhyme of history.’ The Guardian has said “Naylor and two beautifually nuanced performances give equal emotional weight to two disparate victims of religious colonialism in this hugely impressive play”. The performance will be followed by a set from Such Small Hands, an electro-folk/pop project.

You can find tickets to all of these shows at The Old Market website.

 

Holly Martin

holly@bjournal.co

feature image: Rosalind Furlong

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