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| November 16, 2018

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Charity Abseil From i360 For New Premature Baby X-Ray Machine At Royal Sussex

Charity Abseil From i360 For New Premature Baby X-Ray Machine At Royal Sussex
Andrew O'Connor

On March 17th 2018 Brighton’s i360 will be opening its doors while at the top of the tower for charity. Thrill-seeking fundraisers will be allowed to abseil back down 450ft as willing members of the public are sought.

The charity abseil will help Rockinghorse to raise funds for a new specialist x-ray machine for premature babies at the Trevor Mann Baby Unit.

Rockinghorse is the fundraising arm of the Royal Alexandra Children’s Hospital in Brighton. It also supports the Trevor Mann Baby Unit at the Royal Sussex County Hospital and the Special Care Baby Unit at the Princess Royal Hospital in Haywards Heath.

Trevor Mann was a children’s doctor whose skill saved the lives of many babies in Brighton.

He founded the special care baby unit at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton in 1970. This was a response to news of new artificial breathing techniques being used to treat young babies with a low birth weight.

Mann also founded charity ‘Rockinghorse’ in 1967, with the initial aim of providing incubators to neonatal patients outside London.

The Trevor Mann Baby Unit (TMBU) has become one of the foremost centres for treating premature and sick newborn babies. It has dramatically improved post-natal survival rates.

The TMBU in Brighton is a specialist unit for the care of premature and sick newborn babies. It provides special care, high dependency care and intensive care. It also provides a service for babies requiring surgery.

iDrop

iDrop will be operated by Belay Rope Access and is open to the first 30 people to sign up who can raise a minimum £1,000 each in sponsorship for children’s charity Rockinghorse. Two levels of challenge will be available – manual and mechanical descent (the former being considered more difficult).

“The sheer exposure of British Airways i360 is what makes it special. Unlike other abseil venues you are descending in open space rather than against a wall. And the position on the seafront makes it unique. I would challenge anyone not to feel a few nerves when faced with a 450ft drop, so even for experienced people this will present a fearsome challenge.” said Iain Tindall, Director of Belay Rope Access.

The abseil will be tested on January 13th and 14th, while British Airways i360 is closed for annual maintenance.

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