April 17, 2024

Brighton Journal

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Cable TV companies are required to provide live rate totals and the FCC rules.

Cable TV companies are required to provide live rate totals and the FCC rules.

Cable and satellite TV providers will need to show the total costs of video subscriptions as part of the Federal Communications Commission's efforts to improve price transparency.

in New release The total costs include third-party fees that can often pile up unexpectedly for users, the FCC said Thursday. Under the new guidelines, consumers will have the ability to compare providers' costs and programming with other competitors such as streaming services.

“Video programming fees and charges offered by cable and DBS (direct broadcast satellite) providers are often obscured in promotional materials and misleading invoices, causing significant and costly confusion for consumers,” the FCC stated. “This updated ‘all-in-one’ pricing format allows consumers to make informed choices.”

Under the new mandates, cable and satellite companies must clearly identify all costs as a single line item, the FCC said. It is no longer possible to withhold fees such as regional sports programs or approve rebroadcasts.

The FCC plans to end cable early termination fees

The FCC's recent mandates are just the latest example of the group's work to combat unwanted fees and improve transparency.

The Commission is preparing to launch mandatory “broadband consumer labels,” easy-to-understand information regarding the cost and performance of Internet services, and company early termination fees.

Users often pay a sum Extra $37 The 2023 Consumer Reports and General Knowledge report showed that the average monthly bill when watching regional sports, broadcast TV, or using rental set-top boxes.

NCTA and the Internet Television Association pushed back against the ruling March 6 report However, it will be difficult to provide an upfront figure when regional fees vary by location.

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