May 23, 2024

Brighton Journal

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Franklin is rapidly intensifying to become the first major hurricane of the season. East coast to see dangerous rip currents

Franklin is rapidly intensifying to become the first major hurricane of the season.  East coast to see dangerous rip currents

Hurricane Franklin continues to strengthen as it circles across the Atlantic Ocean and is expected to rapidly intensify into the first major hurricane of the season over warm waters between the East Coast and Bermuda.

Forecasters say Franklin could become a Category 3 hurricane by Monday and will pass several hundred miles off the coast of the mid-Atlantic Ocean.

The FOX Forecast Center says the coasts of the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic could see large waves and rip currents over Labor Day weekend, but the forecast remains that the storm will not make landfall in the United States.

Hurricane Franklin is among several systems that are tracking in the active Atlantic Ocean

Where is Hurricane Franklin now?

Hurricane Franklin is located about 575 miles southwest of Bermuda and is moving northwest at 8 mph. Maximum winds reach 90 mph.

Where is Hurricane Franklin headed?

Hurricane Franklin is not expected to make landfall in the United States. The track from the NHC shows the powerful storm moving between the East Coast and Bermuda this week.

The typhoon is expected to move to the north-northwest later on Sunday, followed by a turn to the north and then the northeast during the first part of the work week.

On the forecast track, the hurricane is expected to bridge the gap between Bermuda and the United States

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A guide to the 2023 Atlantic hurricane season

Will the United States be affected by Franklin?

The Fox Forecast Center said that while Hurricane Franklin is not expected to hit the US mainland, large waves will affect the East Coast starting Monday and are likely to continue through the Labor Day weekend. In addition, dangerous currents are expected on beaches up and down the east coast this week.

“It’s not going to be a touchdown for us,” said Britta Merwin, a meteorologist with FOX Weather. “We have a series of basins coming off the east coast, and that will be our garrison. We don’t have to worry about them making landfall on the east coast, but we could see some rough surf conditions.”

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) says the average 2023 Atlantic hurricane season is expected to be roughly the same with as many as 17 named storms.

Merwin adds that by Wednesday morning, waves off the coast of North Carolina could reach 9 to 12 feet in height.

“Fortunately, the strongest and biggest waves will be out of here by the time we get to Labor Day weekend,” she said. “But if we get a lot closer to that corridor, and we have some erosion ashore before Labor Day weekend, we could see some minor impacts there.”

Beware of the “I” storm: it has more retirees than any letter used for Atlantic hurricane names