February 4, 2023

Brighton Journal

Complete News World

Pedro Castillo, From Congressional Shutdown to Prison: A History of Declared Decline | Peru’s president was deposed and Bolvard took office

From Lima

President Pedro Castillo Kicked the Democratic board, but lost the race He was sacked and imprisoned. He did when he was Persecuted by the right who tried to oust him and weakened by the failures of his government and corruption charges against him. The Vice President has been appointed in his place Tina Polwarte, the first woman in the country’s history to be sworn in as president. Pollarde called for a ceasefire and announced a government of national unity with the participation of “all political forces”. Moments before he was sworn in, Castillo’s impeachment attempt to unconstitutionally close Congress was 101 votes in favor, 6 against, and 10 abstentions., which was described as an attempted conspiracy. Castillo was detained in a police station when Bolvard was sworn in as president by Congress. There were demonstrations, the crowd for and against Castillo was not overwhelming. Clashes broke out between the two factions. Demonstrators called for the resignation of Congress and the newly elected president and for early general elections.

Terminal crisis for the Castillo government The explosion followed a surprise news delivered to the nation on television at noon this Wednesday, Yet the president declared an unconstitutional shutdown of Congress. He did so three hours before the start of the parliamentary session in which the motion to impeach him was to be debated and voted on. “Permanent moral incapacity” for pending corruption charges.

Along with the closure of Congress, Castillo also announced the start of an “exceptional emergency government”, the Department of Justice and the National Prosecutor’s Office to investigate him in “restructuring”, and the convening of a Constituent Assembly within nine months. Until the Constituent Assembly is established, he said, he will rule according to the mandate laws.. In what would be his last message as President, a curfew was issued this Wednesday night from ten o’clock, which was not enforced because the President fell before that time and President Pollarde canceled it.

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Closure of Congress

Castillo became very nervous when he read the brief message announcing his desperate attempt to stay in office. He spoke for more than five minutes. The papers in his hand were shaking with the trembling of his hands. He recalled the repeated attempts by the right-wing parliamentary majority to remove him while announcing the shutdown of Congress. He also assured that crimes are being accused without evidence. He accused the right-wing opposition of trying to establish a “parliamentary dictatorship”.

When Castillo delivered his message, there was great uncertainty over whether the opposition would get the 87 votes, two-thirds of Congress, needed to impeach him on the same day for “moral incapacity”. At the time, a former official in his government declared before the Parliamentary Oversight Commission that he had received bribes and paid part of them to Castillo. Like other impeachments against the then President, it concerns the testimony of a prisoner accused of corruption and seeks the judicial advantage of securing his freedom with this testimony.

Apparently, Castillo’s calculations led him to assume that he would gain the right-wing votes that wanted to oust him after that testimony, and he decided to launch himself into shutting down Congress. However, predictions circulated at the time about how the referendum would go were unclear about what the final outcome would be. Nothing was certain at the time. In another message to the nation the night before, Castillo had vowed to respect democracy and go to parliament to face impeachment proceedings against him.

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Castillo’s decision was very wrong. His is a Political suicide televised. The “exceptional emergency government” did not last. After three hours of unconstitutionally trying to shut down Congress—the president can shut down Congress, but only if he first denies the executive two confidence votes, which didn’t happen— Castillo was deposed and imprisoned. After his impeachment was voted on in Congress, Castillo left the government palace. A rumor spread that he was going to the Mexican embassy to claim asylum, but he was arrested and taken to a police station. His defeat ended. He faces criminal charges for attempting to carry out a coup d’état punishable by 10 to 20 years. The Mexican government has granted him asylum.

Castillo’s lonely end

How Castillo announced the shutdown of Congress is inexplicable Without support to support that decision. Immediately after making the announcement, he was singled out. His ministers started resigning one after another Condemning their rejection of what they described as a coup d’état. Castillo did not consult Congress before deciding to close it. All the companies rejected the coup attempt launched from the management. For more than an hour there was uncertainty over the position the military would take on whether to support or oppose Castillo if Congress closed. The uncertainty dissipated when the military announced that it would not obey Castillo’s decision to close Congress. Yet the defeat of the President was complete.

Fallen Castle, assumed President Tina Polwarte. He did it before Congress. “As we all know, there has been an attempted coup,” Bolwart began his first message as president shortly after taking office. Earlier, he had already distanced himself from Castillo’s attempt to shut down parliament in a message on Twitter. Bolavarte congratulated Castillo’s decision that “all the institutions” rejected it.

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Pollarde demands a cease-fire

“I consider myself aware of the enormous responsibility that falls on me as the President of the Constitution. My first request is to call for the broadest unity of all the masses. Talking, conversing, reaching an agreement, something as simple as impractical in recent months. “I call for a broad dialogue process between all political forces, whether or not represented in Congress,” Bolvarde said in his first message as president.

“I demand a political truce to establish a government of national unity,” he asked the legislators who have relentlessly harassed the Castillo government, “I demand a deadline, a valuable time to rescue our country from corruption and misgovernment.” It remains to be seen whether the right wing, betting on destabilization and a coup against Castillo, will be willing to grant him that truce.

The new president announced a “cabinet of all bloods representing all the democratic powers”. Bolavarte, 60, was little known in the political arena until he became vice president at the hands of Castillo. He had been a member of the Peru Libre (PL) party that brought Castillo to government, but was kicked out a few months ago. He assumes the presidency without a party to support him, without its own bench, faces the PL, which was his party, and the parliamentary right, which has already shown itself willing to do anything to protect its subordinate interests. It’s complex.