November 30, 2022

Brighton Journal

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Texas massacre: The story of a woman who covered herself with the blood of a classmate | The 11-year-old girl told me how she played dying to survive the shooting

“I do not want this to happen again,” an 11-year-old girl told the US Congress. How she died and played to survive the shooting at Texas Elementary School Two weeks ago. Mia Cherillo is a fourth-grader at Rob Elementary School in Wolverhampton, Texas Scary detail Incidents in which 19 of his classmates and two teachers were shot dead by an 18-year-old on May 24.

He recalled how they were watching a movie and that they were hiding behind the teacher’s desk and backpack when the gunman entered. “He said‘ good night ’to my teacher and then he shot her in the head. He then shot some of my classmates and the blackboard, “Mia said in a pre-recorded video intervention.

“When I went to the backpack, he shot my friend who was by my side. I thought he was going to go back into the classroom. I took some blood and smeared it all over my body,” he said.

Before taking off, Mia said he was completely quiet His dead teacher’s cell phone could not dial 911 emergency number. “I told them we needed help and wanted to see the police in our classroom,” he said.

Upon learning of that, the Wolverine Police were severely criticized A dozen officers waited outside and did nothing When children die or die.

When asked what he wanted to happen after the attack, he replied “need security”, confirming he feared another gunman would attack his school. “I do not want it to happen again,” he said.

Mia has dreams and is still recovering from the bullet pieces in her back And dealing with the shock, his father Miguel Cherillo told the newspaper USAT today.

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Mia’s testimony confronts Congress Pressure is mounting to retaliate for the growing armed violence across the country, Especially in the form of mass shootings. The Mia school massacre and the massacre at a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, 10 days earlier, shocked the nation and revived urgent calls to restrict the public’s access to weapons indiscriminately.

The House Oversight and Reform Committee also heard from family members of victims of recent mass shootings, including Genetta Everhardt, the mother of the survivor of the racist buffalo massacre that killed 10 African-Americans.

“My son Zaire has a hole in the right side of his neck, two in his back and one in his left leg, caused by a bullet fired from an AR-15 rifle,” Everhardt said. “When I heal his wounds, I can feel the pieces of that bullet on his back. This piece will stay in your body for the rest of your life. Now I want you to imagine that perfect situation for one of your children. “

Roy Guerrero, a pediatrician who treated several victims in Wolverhampton, described seeing “the bodies of two children who had been shot by bullets and had their heads severed and their flesh torn”.

A group of Democrats and Republicans senators, though limited, have been drafting legislation that could be the first attempt to reform gun controls in decades. The package will increase funding for mental health care and school security, slightly expand the background checks on gun buyers, and promote so-called “red flag laws” that allow authorities to confiscate weapons from people who are considered a threat.

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However, this does not include an assault weapons ban or global background checks It does not live up to the expectations of President Joe Biden, progressive Democrats and anti-gun violence activists. But even if an agreement is reached, the initiative must face an equally divided Senate between Democrats and Republicans and gain the support of at least 10 Republicans who oppose significant regulatory reform.

On the other hand, Democrats controlling the House of Representatives sought to approve a wide range of plans on Wednesday, including raising the age of purchase of semi-automatic rifles from 18 to 21. Although those proposals did not have the 60 votes needed to advance in the Senate, Democrats wanted to remain active after the recent mass shootings.

Cornell Whitfield Jr., son of Ruth Whitfield, victim of the 86-year-old buffalo massacre, testified Tuesday in the Senate Judiciary Committee on White Dominant Violence. “Do they expect us to forgive and forget again and again? What do they do?” They were chosen to protect us and our way of life, “he said.